header image 2 

The Man With the History up His Sleeves

            * Cursive since 1969

 || HOME PLATE ||
  
 

    Stephen T. Ziliak

Professor of Economics

Roosevelt University

Department of Economics

College of Arts and Sciences

430 S. Michigan Ave

Chicago, IL 60605

 

Ziliak's Website at Roosevelt University:

http://sites.roosevelt.edu/sziliak

       email: sziliak@roosevelt.edu
       office: 312.341.3763 fax: 312.341.3762


              Martin Luther King Jr.Adam Smith AMartin Luther King Jr.Adam Smith AMartin Luther King Jr.Adam Smith A  

 

             Downloadable CV in pdf (revised: Sept. 2013)

 

 

Education

 

Ph.D., Economics, University of Iowa, 1996

Dissertation:  Essays on Self-Reliance: The United States in the Era of “Scientific Charity”

          Dissertation Advisor: Deirdre N. McCloskey

Ph.D. Certificate, Rhetorics of Inquiry, University of Iowa, 1996 

B.A., Economics, Indiana University, 1986 

Languages:  English (native), some Spanish, some Latin (Summa cum laude, National Latin Exam, 1979).

 

Research Fields

 

Welfare & Poverty

Economic History, Rhetoric, & Philosophy

History and Philosophy of Science and Statistics

 

Teaching Fields

 

Various

 

Academic Appointments

 

Project on Rhetoric of Inquiry (University of Iowa): Resident Scholar, 1993-1996.

 

University of Iowa: Instructor, 1994.

 

Bowling Green State University: Assistant Professor, 1996-2001 (on leave: Fall 1999-Spring 2001).

 

Emory University: Visiting Assistant Professor, 1999-2003.

 

Georgia Institute of Technology: Visiting Assistant Professor, 2000-2003.

 

      *Awarded "Faculty Member of the Year" (2002)

      *Awarded "Most Intellectual Professor" (2003)

 

Roosevelt University: Associate Professor, 2003-2006.

 

Roosevelt University: Professor, 2006-present.

 

University of Manchester, UK: Visiting Professor, Post-Graduate Workshop on Advanced Research Methods, ESRC/Association for Heterodox Economics, February 2005.

 

Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam: Visiting Professor, Erasmus School of Economics, March 2006.

 

University of Aarhus: Visiting Professor, CREATES Center for Research in Econometric Analysis of Time Series, Aarhus, Denmark, June 2008.

 

Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven: Visiting Professor, LICOS Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, Leuven, Belgium, May 2009 and May 2012.

 

University of Wisconsin-Madison: Visiting Professor, School of Medicine and Public Health, Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholars Program, October 2011.

École Nationale Supérieure d'Arts et Métiers ParisTech: Visiting Professor, Paris, France; Management Sciences, Bioengineering, and English, November 2011 and November 2012.

Sorbonne-Institut d'Administration des Entreprises de Paris (Sorbonne Graduate Business School): Visiting Professor, Paris, France; November 2011.                   

Kadir Has University: Visiting Professor, Istanbul, Turkey; Graduate Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, April 2012.

 

Recent Honors

Elected to the Board of Trustees, Roosevelt University (Jan. 2010 to June 2010; June 2010 to June 2013). Committees: Academic Affairs, Facilities, and Finance.

 

Appointed to the U.S. Task Force on Curricular Reform, the Economics Education Committee, Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET) (2010- ).

 

Appointed to the International Programme Committee, the Second Beeronomics Conference on The Economics of Beer and Brewing, Freising, Germany, Sept. 21-24, 2011.

 

Appointed to the Scientific Committee, the Third Beeronomics Conference on The Economics of Beer and Brewing, York, England, Sept. 18-21, 2013.

 

Keynote speaker, "Guinnessometrics: The Economic Foundation of Student's t," at the 1st Beeronomics Conference on The Economics of Beer and Brewing, Leuven, Belgium, May 27-29, 2009.

 

Chair, "Best Article in the History of Economics," History of Economics Society, 2011-2012.  Details are here.

 

Associate Editor, Historical Statistics of the United States: Colonial Times to the Present (Cambridge University Press, 2006).

 

Founding Member, World Economics Association

 

Board of Editors, Journal of Economic Methodology (1997-2007); Econ Journal Watch (2003- ); Review of Social Economy (2007- ); International Journal of Pluralism in Economic Education (2008-)

 

“Faculty Member of the Year,” Georgia Institute of   Technology, Student Government Association, 2002

        

          “Most Intellectual Professor” (Dean Griffin Faculty Superlative  Award), Georgia Institute of Technology, Office of Dean of Students, Omicron Delta Kappa, Presidents’ Council, Tech Ambassadors, Student Council, and Student Government Association, 2003

 

Advisor, Academia Vitae, the first private university in Dutch history, 2007-2010, Deventer, The Netherlands (Founder and Dean: Arjo Klamer). R.I.P.: A great idea, Klamer's is: but 2007-2008 was a tough year for launching the new school.

 

Helen Potter Award for Best Paper in Social Economics (2002): “Pauper Fiction in Economic Science: `Paupers in Almshouses’ and the Odd Fit of Oliver Twist,Review of Social Economy. Awarded by the Association for Social Economics.

 

Plenary Lecture, "The Culture of Statistical Significance," American Economic Association meetings (ASSAs), San Diego, Jan. 2004

 

Mini-symposium on The Cult of Statistical Significance, June 24, 2008, University of Aarhus, Denmark, Center for Research in Econometric Analysis of Time Series (CREATES).

 

Plenary Lecture, "The Culture of Statistical Significance," Association for Heterodox Economics, University of Leeds, UK, 2004

 

Invited Lecture for special session on Student's t - 100 Years Later, "Guinnessometrics: The Economic Foundation of Student's t," 24th meeting of the International Biometric Society, in conjunction with the Irish Statistical Association, July 16, 2008, University College Dublin

 

Invited Lecture, "The Cult of Statistical Significance," American Statistical Association/Joint Statistical Meetings, Washington, DC, August 2009     

 

Invited Lecture, "The Cult of Statistical Significance," American Statistical Association, Chicago Chapter, East Bank Club, November 2009

 

Lecture and Discussion, Biomedical Computing Interest Group (BCIG) Book Club, Ziliak’s and McCloskey’s The Cult of Statistical Significance: How the Standard Error Costs Us Jobs, Justice, and Lives (2008), National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center, Bethesda, MD, April 22, 2010. 

 

Berger Seminar and Inaugural Lecture for the Quantitative Institute for the Social Sciences (QISS), "The Cult of Statistical Significance," University of Kentucky, Department of Economics, Department of Statistics, and Quantitative Institute for the Social Sciences, Lexington, KY, October 2009

 

            Click here to blog

 

Invited Lecture, The Cult of Statistical Significance, Post-Graduate Workshop in Heterodox Economics, Association for Heterodox Economics, University of Manchester, UK, 2005.

 

Plenary Lecture, McCloskey's The Rhetoric of Economics--Twenty Years Later, Rhetoric and Economics Conference, Millikin University, June 2005.

 

Plenary Lecture, The Cult of Statistical Significance, Rhetoric and Economics Conference, Millikin University, June 2005.

 

Listed: Who's Who in the World; Who's Who in America; Who's Who Among America's Teachers and Educators

 

 

                             Books

 

1.   (Editor and contributor) Measurement and Meaning in Economics: The Essential Deirdre McCloskey (Cheltenham, U.K.: Edward Elgar, 2001); paperback, January 2003.

 

Economists of the Twentieth Century Series.

 

                                

 

2.  (Lead author) The Cult of Statistical Significance: How the Standard Error Costs Us Jobs, Justice, and Lives (University of Michigan Press, 2008).  With Deirdre McCloskey.          

           

How statistical significance testing is causing a loss of jobs, justice, ecology, and even human lives.

 

                                              Precision is nice but Oomph is the bomb!

 

 

3.  The Economic Conversation (forthcoming).  With Arjo Klamer and Deirdre McCloskey.  http://www.theeconomicconversation.com

 

A comprehensive introduction to micro and macro, employing Socratic dialogue, historical fiction, and alternative economic perspectives.

 

                         

 

 

        Articles & Book Chapters

 

                   4.  "The Standard Error of Regressions” (with D. N. McCloskey), Journal of Economic Literature 34 (March 1996), pp. 97-114. 

 

            Reprinted: Chp. 17 in S. T. Ziliak, ed., Measurement and Meaning in Economics: The Essential Deirdre McCloskey (Cheltenham, U.K.: Edward Elgar, 2001); Reprinted: in John B. Davis, ed., Recent Developments in Economic Methodology (Edward Elgar, 2005); Reprinted: in Andrew Lo, ed., Financial Econometrics (Edward Elgar, 2007).

 

<< cited by RePEc [Research Papers in Economics] as the 4th most frequently downloaded article in the economics profession, Winter 2004.  The RePEc database contains over 176,000 published journal articles >> 

 

                   5.  “The End of Welfare and the Contradiction of Compassion,” The Independent Review I (1, Spring 1996), pp. 55-73

 

6.  “Kicking the Malthusian Vice: Lessons from the Abolition of `Welfare’ in the Late Nineteenth Century,” Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance 37 (2, Summer 1997), pp.  449-68. 

 

Published in a special issue on the comparative histories of welfare reform, 19th and 20th century. 

 

7.  “D. N. McCloskey and the Rhetoric of a Scientific Economics,” pp. ix-xxvi, in S. T. Ziliak, ed., Measurement and Meaning in Economics (2001).

 

8.  “What are Models for?” In Warren J. Samuels and Jeff E. Biddle, eds., Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology 19-A (Elsevier Press, 2001), pp. 149-159.

 

9.  (Lead article) “Pauper Fiction in Economic Science: `Paupers in Almshouses’ and the Odd Fit of Oliver Twist,Review of Social Economy 55 (2, June 2002), pp. 159-181.

 

10.  “Haiku Economics,” Rethinking Marxism 14 (September 2002), pp. 111-112.

 

Copyright: Getty Images and The Guardian

 

11.  “Some Tendencies of Social Welfare and the Problem of Interpretation,” Cato Journal 21 (3, Winter 2002), pp. 499-513.

 

12.  “Economic History and the Rebirth of Respectable Characters,” Post-Autistic Economics Review (December 2002). http://www.paecon.net; reprinted: E. Fullbrook, ed., Real World Economics, Anthem Press, 2007.

                                                                       

<< cited as one of the “Important Texts” of the Post-Autistic Economics Movement, www.paecon.net >>

 

13.  “Freedom to Exchange and the Rhetoric of Economic Correctness.”  In Warren J. Samuels and Jeff E. Biddle, eds., Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology 21-A (Elsevier Press, 2003), pp. 331-41.

 

14.  “Palimpsest and ‘The New Economic Methodology.’”  In Warren J. Samuels and Jeff E. Biddle, eds., Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology 21-A (Elsevier Press, 2003), pp. 194-207.

 

15.  “The Significance of the Economics Research Paper.”  In Edward Fullbrook, ed., A Guide to What’s Wrong with Economics (Anthem Press 2004), Chp. 21, pp. 223-236.

 

16.  “Self-Reliance Before the Welfare State: Evidence from the Charity Organization Movement in the United States,” Journal of Economic History 64 (2, June 2004): 433-461.         

 

 17.  “Size Matters: The Standard Error of Regressions in the American Economic Review,” Journal of Socio-Economics 33 (5, December 2004), pp. 527-546.  With Deirdre McCloskey.

 

Published in a symposium on Ziliak-McCloskey research concerning the use and abuse of significance testing in economics and other disciplines.  Reprinted simultaneously in Econ Journal Watch (www.econjournalwatch.org).

           

<< cited by Science Direct as the 2nd most frequently downloaded paper in the Journal of Socio-Economics, Fall 2005 >>

 

18.  “Significance Redux,Journal of Socio-Economics 33 (5, December 2004), pp. 665-675.  With Deirdre McCloskey. 

 

Replies to published comments by Clive Granger, Graham Elliott, Joel Horowitz, Edward Leamer, Tony O’Brien, Erik Thorbecke, Jeffrey Wooldridge, and Arnold Zellner.

 

19.  “Reply to Thomas Schelling: Size Matters,” Econ Journal Watch 1 (3, December 2004), pp. 540-2.  With Deirdre McCloskey.  www.econjournalwatch.org

 

         20.  “Reply to Robert Gelfond: Size Matters,” Econ Journal Watch 1 (3, December 2004), pp. 544-5.  With Deirdre McCloskey.  www.econjournalwatch.org

           

21.  “Poor Law—United States.”  Pp. 274-7 in John M. Herrick and Paul H. Stuart, eds., Encyclopedia of Social Welfare in the United States (New York: Sage Publications, 2004).

 

22.  “Why I Left Alan Greenspan To Seek Economic Significance: The Confessions of an α-Male,” Rethinking Marxism 17 (1, January 2005), pp. 45-58.

 

23.  (Inaugural article in a new series) “On Autobiography: Recommended Readings (and Re-readings) in Economic History.”  Published on EH-Teach, an on-line publication of the Economic History Association, September 2005.

 

24.  “Haiku Economics, No. 2,” Rethinking Marxism 17 (4, October 2005), pp. 567-9.

 

25.  “Heterodox Economics and the Resurrection of Economic Significance,” in John T. Harvey and Robert F. Garnett, Jr., eds., Future Directions for Heterodox Economics, University of Michigan Press, 2008, pp. 95-115.

 

26.  “It’s your Birthday, Welfare: 400 Years of Happy Frustration,” 2,200 words.

           

27.  “Deirdre N. McCloskey,” in Ross B. Emmett, ed., The Elgar Companion to the Chicago School of Economics (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2010).

 

28.  “Public Assistance: Colonial Times to the 1920s” (with the assistance of Joan Underhill Hannon).  A chapter in the millennial edition of Historical Statistics of the United States: Colonial Times to the Present (Cambridge University Press, 2006)*.  Eds. Susan B. Carter, Richard Sutch, et al. 

 

            *Winner of RUSA Outstanding Reference Award, Honorable Mention, Dartmouth Medal, and Booklist Editor's Choice

            

            Get the facts here

              What Reviewers Say:  "For starters, it [Historical Statistics of the United States] weighs 29 pounds. It has five volumes. And it's densely packed with more than a million numbers that measure America in mind-boggling detail, from the average annual precipitation in Sweet Springs, Mo., to the wholesale price of rice in Charleston S.C., in 1707... The new edition, which is also available in an online version, is a gold mine for scholars, students and assorted nerds and numbers crunchers..."

 

 

29.   “Signifying Nothing: Reply to Hoover and Siegler.”  With Deirdre McCloskey, Journal of Economic Methodology.  March 2008. SEE IT NOW

 

30.    “Positive Social Science,” in William Darity, Jr., ed., International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences.  2nd Edition, 2007.

 

31.    “Normative Social Science,” in William Darity, Jr., ed., International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences.  2nd Edition, 2007.

 

32.    “Rhetoric,” in William Darity, Jr., ed., International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences.  2nd Edition, 2007.

 

33.  "The Economic Foundation of 'Student's' t," SEE IT NOW

 

34.  "Is there life after Samuelson's Economics: Changing the textbooks." With Arjo Klamer and Deirdre McCloskey real-world economics review 42 (18 May, 2007): 2-7.

 

35.  "Guinnessometrics: The Economic Foundation of 'Student's' t, Journal of Economic Perspectives 22 (4, Fall 2008): 199-216.  SEE IT NOW

 

36. "Is the p-Form of the t-Table Fraudulent?-Yes, It Misrepresents Scientific Thought and Credit," under review, SEE IT NOW 

 

37. "Haiku Economics: Little Teaching Aids for Big Economic Pluralists," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education I (1/2, 2009): 108-125.

SEE IT NOW 

 

38. [with Deirdre McCloskey].  "Science is Judgment, Not Only Calculation: A Reply to Aris Spanos," Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 1 (1, Autumn 2008): 165-170     SEE IT NOW 

 

39. [with Deirdre McCloskey].  "The Unreasonable Ineffectiveness of Fisherian Statistics in Biology, and Especially in Medicine," Biological Theory 4 (1, Winter 2009, The MIT Press).    SEE IT NOW

 

40.  [with Deirdre McCloskey]. "The Cult of Statistical Significance," Proceedings of the Joint Statistical Meetings, 2009.  SEE IT NOW

 

41. "W. S. Gosset and Some Neglected Concepts in Experimental Statistics: Guinnessometrics II," Journal of Wine Economics 6 (2, 2011), pp. 552-577.  The "Beeronomics" issue. 

 

42. "The Validus Medicus and a new gold standard," The Lancet (vol. 376, July 31, 2010).

 

43. "Haiku Economics," Poetry (January issue, 2011).

 

44.  Reply to Stephen Senn: "Significant Errors--Author Reply," The Lancet (vol. 376, Oct. 23, 2010). 

 

45.  Brief of Amici Curiae, Supreme Court of the United States, No. 09-1156, Matrixx et. al. v. Siracusano and NECA-IBEW Pension Fund, filed Nov. 12, 2010 (with Deirdre N. McCloskey).

 

46.  "Visualizing Uncertainty: On Soyer's and Hogarth's 'Illusion of Predictability," International Journal of Forecasting, forthcoming July 2012. 

 

47.  "On Randomized Field Experiments in Economics: Student against Levitt and List," forthcoming 2013.

 

48.  (with D. McCloskey). "Statistical Significance, Ethics, and the Law: Why Statistical Practice is Changing," in G. DeMartino and D. McCloskey, eds., Considerations on Professional Economic Ethics: Views from the Economics Profession and Beyond, Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2014.

 

49.  "Heads I Win, Tails You Lose: Student, Fisher, and the False Promise of Randomization," in G. DeMartino and D. McCloskey, eds., Considerations on Professional Economic Ethics: Views from the Economics Profession and Beyond, Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2014.

 

50.  "Econ, Poetry, and People," in R. Garnett, P. Lewis, and L. Ealy, eds., Commerce and Community, Routledge, forthcoming 2014.

 

        Incomplete listing: for Stephen T. Ziliak's full CV click here.

 

Book Reviews

 

51.  Review of Paul A. Jargowsky’s Poverty and Place: Ghettos, Barrios, and the American City (1997), Journal of Economic History 58(1), March 1998, pp. 264-266.

 

52.  Review of Ada F. Haynes’ Poverty in Central Appalachia (1997), Journal of Economic History 58(1), March 1998, pp. 264-266.

 

53.  Review of Irwin Unger’s The Best of Intentions: The Triumph and Failure of the Great Society Under Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon (1996), Economic History Association, EH-Net, October 1998.

 

54.  Review of James L. Payne’s Overcoming Welfare: Expecting More from the Poor and from Ourselves (New York: Basic Books, 1998), The Independent Review IV (1, Summer 1999), pp. 144-7.

 

55.  Review of Michael J. Graetz and Jerry L. Mashaw’s True Security: Rethinking American Social Insurance (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1999), Journal of Economic History (June 2000).

 

56.  Review of Gary R. Lowe and P. Nelson Reid’s The Professionalization of Poverty: Social Work and the Poor in the Twentieth Century (Hawthorne: Aldine de Gruyter, 1999), Journal of Economic History (Fall 2000).

 

57.  Review of A. B. Atkinson’s The Economic Consequences of Rolling Back the Welfare State (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1999), Journal of Economic Literature  39 (1, March 2001), pp. 144-6.

 

58.  Review of Dwight B. Billings and Kathleen M. Blee’s The Road to Poverty:king of Wealth and Hardship in Appalachia

 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), Journal of Interdisciplinary History  32 (1, Summer 2001), pp. 144-6.        

 

59.  Review of David Hammack’s, ed., Making the NonProfit Sector in the United States: A Reader (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1998), Journal of Economic History (March 2001).

 

60.  Review of Hugo A. Keuzenkamp’s Probability, Econometrics, and Truth: The Methodology of Econometrics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000), Journal of Economic History 61 (2, June 2001), pp. 578-80.

 

61.  Review of Joel Schwartz’s Fighting Poverty with Virtue: Moral Reform and America’s Urban Poor, 1825-2000 (Indiana University Press, 2000), The Independent Review 6 (2, Spring 2002).

 

62.  Review of Alice O’Connor, Chris Tilly, and Lawrence D. Bobo, eds., Urban Inequality: Evidence from Four Cities, Journal of Economic History 61 (4, Dec. 2001), pp. 1145-6.

 

63.  Review of Steven King’s Poverty and welfare in England, 1700-1850 (Manchester University Press, 2000), Economic History Association, EH-Net, October 2001.

 

64.  Review of Steven King’s Poverty and welfare in England, 1700-1850, Journal of Interdisciplinary History (Fall 2002).

 

65.  Review of Robert A. Margo’s Wages and Labor Markets in the United States, 1820- 1860, International Review of Social History 47 (3, Dec. 2002), pp. 496-99.

 

66.  Review of Sheldon Danziger and Robert Haveman, ed., Understanding Poverty, Journal of Economic History 62 (4, Dec. 2002), pp. 1165-6.

 

67.  Review of Jeffrey Sklansky’s The Soul’s Economy: Market Society and Selfhood in American Thought, 1820-1920, Journal of Economic History 63 (3, 2003), pp. 903-5.

 

68.  Review of Lawrence J. Friedman and Mark D. McGarvie’s Charity, Philanthropy, and Civility in American History, Journal of Economic History 64 (1, March 2004), pp. 273-4.

 

69.  Review of Peter Saunder’s The End and Means of Welfare, Economic Record 80 (250, September 2004), pp. 346-57.

 

70.  Review of Tony Lawson’s Reorienting Economics, Journal of Socio-Economics (2008).

 

71.  Review of Jonathan A. Glickstein’s American Exceptionalism/American Anxiety: Wages, Competition, and Degraded Labor in the Antebellum United States, International Review of Social History 49 (2, 2004).

 

72.  Review of Jocelyn Elise Crowley’s The Politics of Child Support in America, EH-Net (the on-line publication of the Economic History Association).  March 2004.

                                                        

 

Research in Progress                                                                  

 

 

Rhetoric of Human and Life Sciences

 

Student's Methods: Science Before Fisher (book).

 

What does empirical research look like in an anti-foundational world, and can its findings connect to questions of efficiency and social justice?  The life and times of William Sealy Gosset (1876-1937) say Yes.  This book describes the scientific character of Gosset, the inventor of the t-test, a practical Bayesian, and the unknown father of economic significance.  A marriage of philosophical pragmatism with Bayesian statistics can further Gosset’s twin yet neglected stances of anti-foundational epistemology and socially conscious science.

 

The New Applied Theory of Price (with Deirdre McCloskey).  Third Edition (MacMillan).  Microeconomic theory and applications.  Suitable for first year graduate students and advanced undergraduates.

 

“An Economic Criticism of English Literature” (book; with Deirdre McCloskey and Mary Beth Combs).

 

A Norton-anthology type book, designed to be a bedside reader for non-economist lovers of economics and literature.

 

            “Recent Innovations for Charlie Brown’s Teacher:  Some Uses of Fiction in Undergraduate Economics.” 

 

 

Economic History:

 

Self-Reliance (book).

 

                       An economic and cultural history of the idea that privatizing welfare builds self-                      reliance among the poor.  The context is urban and rural America, 19th and 20th century.          

 

“State Charities and Corrections: Civil War to the Great Depression”

           

Welfare and prisons grew up together, yet little is known about their history.  This is a major data collection project on the so-called “state charities and corrections”—1860s to the New Deal.

 

            “Sex and the City: Female Educational Attainment and the History of Marrying Up” (with Roderick Duncan).

 

The population of college educated women in the United States exceeds that of men by more than two million and the difference is rising.  Yet women have a  history of marrying men with more education–a tendency that rises in probability, the post-War evidence says, as women acquire more education.  It’s like “Sex and the City,” the prophesy of James Thurber.  The new season, a season of “marrying down,” or not at all, may carry implications for personnel policy, wage differentials, and the gender division of labor.

 

 

Major Archival Research Projects

 

Testing, Estimation, and the Design of Experiments -- the Scientific Contributions of William Sealy Gosset (1876-1937):  Guinness Archives (Guinness Storehouse, Dublin); University College London Special Collections; Museum for English Rural Life (University of Reading, UK). 

 

The History and Philosophy of Statistical Significance:  University College London Special Collections (Karl Pearson, Egon Pearson, W. S. Gosset, Ronald Fisher, and Jerzy Neyman files); University of Chicago (Crerar, Regenstein, Eckhart); University of Illinois-Chicago (Health Sciences, Math, Science).

 

Classical Economics, Literary Representations, and the Rise and Fall of the Poorhouse: University of Iowa, Main Library, Government Publications; Emory University Woodruff Library, Government Publications; Bowling Green State University, Main Library, Government Publications; Indiana Historical Society Library; Indiana State Library; Iowa Historical Society Library.

 

Welfare Reform in History—the Charity Organization Society: Indiana Historical Society Library; Indiana State Library; Iowa Historical Society Library; City of Indianapolis Department of Municipal Records; Indiana University-Purdue University Main Library; Marion County Public Library.

 

 

Conference Presentations

 

“The Contradiction of Compassion.” Eastern Economic  Association, New York City, Mar. 1995;  Social Science History Association, Chicago, Oct. 1995;  Cliometric Society, ASSA, San Francisco, Jan. 1996;

 

“The Rhetoric of Welfare Reform.”  The Dickens Conference (Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Association), University of California-Santa Cruz, April 1995

 

“A Malthusian Vice.”  Social Science History Association, New Orleans, Oct. 1996; American Economic Association, ASSA, New Orleans,  Jan. 1997; National Policy History Conference, Bowling Green State University, June 1997 (panel organizer); 

 

“Economics: the Dismal or the Gay Science?”  The Style Conference, Bowling Green State University, July 1997 (panel organizer)

 

“The Rhetorics of Self-Reliance.”  Eastern Economic Association, New York City, Feb. 1998

 

“Public Assistance: Colonial Times to the 1920s.”  Social Science History Conference, a panel on the millennial edition of The Historical Statistics of the United States.  With Joan Underhill Hannon and Price Fishback.  Fort Worth, TX, November 1999

 

“Pauper Fiction: Paupers in Almshouses and the Odd Fit of Oliver Twist, 1850-1923.” Fourth World Congress of Cliometrics, Montreal, July 6-9, 2000

 

 “Measures of Poverty Across Time and Space: The Challenges of Building Historical and International Poverty Measures,” Social Science History Association, Pittsburgh, October 26-29, 2000.

 

“Standard Errors in the 1990s,” Eastern Economic Association, New York City, Feb. 2003

                                   

“Interpretative Econometrics from α to Ω: Heterodox Economics and the Resurrection of Economic Significance,” ICAPE Conference on the Future of Heterodox Economics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, June 5-7, 2003.

 

“From Worthy Widows to Welfare Queens? The Elizabethan Poor Law and the Rhetoric of Relief in the Middle West,” 400 Years of Charity Conference, The Voluntary Action History Society, The University of Liverpool, and the Centre for Civil Society.  University of Liverpool, September 11-13, 2001.

 

“Size Matters,”American Economic Association and Association for Social Economics, San Diego, CA, Jan. 2004.  With Morris Altman, Kenneth Arrow, Clive Granger, Edward Leamer, Deirdre McCloskey, Tony O’Brien, Erik Thorbecke, and Arnold Zellner.

 

(plenary address) “Size Matters,” Association for Heterodox Economics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, July 2004.

 

“Size Matters,” Meetings of the Southern Economic Association, New Orleans, November 2004.

 

“Against Testimation,” Post-Graduate Workshop in Advanced Research Methods, Association for Heterodox Economics, Manchester, U.K., Feb 4-6, 2005.  Invited keynote speaker and faculty mentor.

                                                           

(plenary address) “Size Matters,” Rhetoric and Economics Conference, Millikin University, June 6-9, 2005.  With Deirdre McCloskey.

 

Roundtable Discussion: The Rhetoric of Economics--20 Years On,” Rhetoric and Economics Conference, Millikin University, June 6-9, 2005.  With Arjo Klamer, Benny Balak, and Deirdre McCloskey.

 

Other Conference Activity:  Participant, “The Teaching of Economics,” Bowling Green State University, Spring 1997; Roundtable Participant, “Liberty and the Problem of Cultural and Institutional Rigidities,” Santa Clara University, San Jose, CA, October 1999; (Invited Faculty Mentor/Critic), Ph.D. Student Conference on Interdisciplinary Research, Institute for Liberal Arts, Emory University, Spring 2002; Roundtable Participant, “The Contributions of Lord Peter Bauer to Economic Development,” Texas A&M-College Station, September 2003.  Roundtable Participant, “Tocqueville, Olmsted, and the Meaning of Public Space,” Liberty Fund, September 2006; annual meetings of the American Economic Association: numerous years.


 

 

            Other Invited Presentations

 

“Size Matters”

 

·        Economics Colloquium, University of Georgia (Athens),

      Nov.  2002

·        School of Public Affairs, Baruch College (CUNY), Feb. 2003

·        Economics Colloquium, Illinois State (Normal), Nov. 2004

·        Center for Population Economics, University of Chicago, May 2005

·        Seminar on Economics, Philosophy, and Politics, George Mason University, Oct.  2005

 

“A Variation on Klein’s Constants”

 

·        Ivan Allen Lecture, Ivan Allen College, Georgia Institute of Technology, Oct.  2001

 

“Paupers in Almshouses”

 

·        SCHLITS (History) Roundtable: Georgia Tech, Georgia State, and Emory University, Feb.  2001

 

“Self-Reliance:”

 

·        University of Michigan, Economic History Workshop, April 1998

·        Agnes Scott College, Faculty and Students, April 1999

·        Emory University, Economics Colloquium, November 1999

·        Georgia Institute of Technology, Economics Colloquium, February 2000

·        Roosevelt University, School of Policy Studies, January 2003

·        University of the South, Economics Colloquium, January 2003

 

"The Contradiction of Compassion:”

 

·        College of the Holy Cross, Economics Colloquium, Feb. 1996

·        Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Economics Colloquium, Feb. 1996

·        Indiana University-Indianapolis, Economics Colloquium, Feb. 1997

·        Indiana University-Indianapolis, Jane Addams Fellows,

      Center on Philanthropy, Feb. 1997

·        Indiana University-Bloomington, Economic History Workshop, April 1997

 

 

“Re-figuring the Science in Scientific Charity:”

 

·        Loyola University, Chicago, Economics Colloquium, April 1999.

 

“The Standard Error of Regressions:”                         

 

·        University of Iowa, Economics Colloquium, Oct. 1995

·        Indiana University-Bloomington, Econometrics Colloquium, April 1996

·        Bowling Green State University, Econometrics Seminar, Oct. 1998

·        Georgia Institute of Technology, Economics Seminar, March 2002

 

“Rhetorical Studies of Economics:”

 

·        Department of English, Ph.D. Program in “Writing and Learning in the Disciplines,” Bowling Green State University, 1996

·        American Culture Studies, Ph.D. Program, Bowling Green State University, 1998

           

“Some Uses of Fiction in Undergraduate Economics:”

 

·        Teaching Colloquium, College of Business Administration, Bowling Green State University, 1997

 

“Reparations for Descendants of African-American Slaves?”

 

·        RACES student group, Emory University, April 2002

 


 

Selected Media Coverage

 

            The Economist:  “Signifying Nothing?” Article in Economics Focus,  31 January 2004 (by John Smutniak). 

 

            Chronicle of Higher Education:  Article, “Taking on ‘Rational Man’,” Jan. 24,  2003 (by Peter Monaghan).

 

            Science Magazine: Feb. 1, 2005, Article, “Getting Rich--A No Brainer?” (by Kim Krieger).  Comment on research of Santa Fe Institute.

 

Forskning: Feb. 6, 2005, Article, “Hodelřst aksjemarked?”

(by Ingrid Spilde).  On “Size Matters.” Danish Press.ADVANCE \x 540  

Figyelo: Feb. 5, 2004.  Article, "Hazug számok – vak közgazdászok" (by Kovacs Timea).  On "Size Matters." Figyelo is the leading finance and economics press of Budapest.

 

Notas Monetarias (Banco de Guatemala):  2000, “La enseńanza de Estadística y Econometría a estudiantes universitarios de pregrado,”

Recommends that Bank economists use “The Standard Error of Regressions” to guide their research.


Privreda.net:  Sept. 23, 2005: “
Statistika zavarava i najveće ekonomiste,” Teorija/Praksa.”  Zagreb (Croatia) Press.  On “Size Matters.”

 

Post-Autistic Economics Review: various appearances (www.paecon.net).  British and International.

 

            Chance (Dartmouth College): Feb. 9, 2004, Article on Ziliak-McCloskey papers.

 

Marginalrevolution.com: Aug. 2004:  On “Size Matters.”

 

 Heterodox Economics Newsletter, Issue 7: Feb. 11, 2005, recommends “Size Matters.” <http://l.web.umkc.edu/leefs/htn7.htm>

 

The Independent Institute: various cites on Ziliak and history of welfare.

 

Roosevelt Review: Fall 2005, faculty profile, Roosevelt University Alumni Magazine.  Author article on “Size Matters.”

 

Iowa City Press-Citizen: Author article on “The Contradiction of Compassion,” 1995.

 

 

Service

 

Other Academic

 

            Referee and reviewer:  Economic Record, EH-Net, Feminist Economics, H-Net, The Independent Review, International Review of Social History, Journal of Economic History, Journal of Economic Literature, Journal of Economic Methodology, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Journal of Political Economy, Journal of Socio-Economics, Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology, Review of Social Economy, Social Science History, Blackwell Publishers, Duxbury Press, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Prentice-Hall, National Science Foundation.

 

                        Economics Writer: Breeze, a magazine of arts and culture, Bloomington, Indiana, 1995-1996.

 

            Conference Organizer: "Markets and Morals: The Rhetoric of a Middle Class," University of Iowa, October 6-7, 1995.  With Gerald R. Bosch.

 

 

University & Departmental

(Roosevelt, Emory, Georgia Tech, and Bowling Green)

 

 

Roosevelt

 

            Established a “Memorandum of Understanding” for the international exchange of faculty, administrators, and students of Roosevelt University and Academie Vitae (Deventer, The Netherlands).  With Arjo Klamer (President and Founder of Academie Vitae), Rubee Li Fuller, and others.  Spring 2006-Spring 2007.

 

            Developed Quantitative Assessment System for Core Courses, Roosevelt University, School of Policy Studies, Spring 2004.

 

            Supervised Quantitative Assessment for Core Courses, Roosevelt University, School of Policy Studies, 2004-present.

 

(Chair) Faculty Search Committee, Economics, Roosevelt University, 2004-2005.

 

(Chair) Faculty Search Committee, Economics, Roosevelt University, 2005-2006.

           

            Co-Author, Environmental SCAN, Faculty of Economics, Roosevelt University, 2004-2005. With Sam Rosenberg.

 

            Coordinator, Economics Seminar, Spring 2005-present.    

           

            Committee Member, Faculty Search Committee, Political Science, Roosevelt University, 2003-2004.

 

Developed New Course: “The Rhetoric of Economics and Other Human Sciences in Public Affairs.”  First offered Spring 2006 (300/400 level).

 

Director:  Senior Honors Thesis, Lauren Schoenherr (2006).

 

Faculty Mentor, Honors Research Program: Brian Dooley, Spring 2005, Fall 2005, and Christian Delgado Jesus, Fall 2005, Spring 2006, Summer 2006.  On-going research concerning my textbook, The Economic Conversation.

 

            Fully Revised Undergraduate Course Descriptions, Economics, Roosevelt University, 2004.   

 

Fully Revised Economics Degree-Program Descriptions (on-going with June Lapidus), Fall 2005.

 

Assisted in Development of Economics Department Web Site (Fall 2005, on-going).

 

Et cetera. 

 

Emory & Georgia Tech

 

            Master’s Committees: Georgia Tech School of Economics: Jessica Madriaga (M.A., ‘04).

 

            Senior Thesis Committees: Rachel Tan (Emory, ‘01); Rudy Mehrbani (Emory, ‘02); Katie High (Emory, ‘02); Steven Popick (Georgia Tech, ‘02); Sean Carroll (Georgia Tech, ‘02); Daniel “Kory” Bilton (Georgia Tech, ‘03).

 

Designed New Graduate-Level Course: “Research Methods in Economics,” Georgia Tech, 2001. 

 

Designed New Undergraduate Seminar: “Poverty and Discrimination” (Honors), Emory University.

 

Faculty Advisor, Executive Round Table (ERT), Georgia Tech, 2003-2004.

 

Faculty Advisor, RACES, an Emory University student organization dedicated to thinking about issues of race and ethnicity.

 

            Invited Member, Honor’s Recognition Program Selection Committee, Georgia Tech, 2003-2004.

 

 

Bowling Green

 

            Faculty, the Ph.D. Program in Institutional Theory and History (Co-Directors: John Hoag [Economics], Ned McClennan [Philosophy], Don Rowney [History]).

 

Faculty, the Ph.D. Program in Policy History (Chair: Donald Nieman [History])

 

            Director, Economics Colloquium, 1997-99.

 

            Advisory Committee, Center for Governmental Research and Public Service, 1998-99.

 

            Search Committee for a Director, Center for Governmental Research and Public Service, 1998-99.

 

            Faculty Resource for the Ph.D. Program “Writing and Learning in the Disciplines” (Director: Richard Gebhardt), Department of English.

 

                        Dissertation Committees: Ph.D. program in Policy History, Department of History, Students: Mark Phillips (1996-2000); David Trevino (1998- ).

 

            Master’s Committees: Master of Organization Development, College of Business Administration, Students: Aruna Fernandes (M.A., 1997).

 

Promotion and Tenure Committee, 1997-8

 

External Review Committee, 1997-8

 

Graduate Committee, 1997-8

 

Salary Advisory Committee, 1997-8

 

Committee for the Evaluation of Leadership under the Chair, 1998-2000

 

(Assessment Committee) Moral Reasoning in Undergraduate Economics, 1999

 

Scholarship Committee, 1997-98

 

 

Other Academic Awards and Research Support

 

            H.B. Earhart Dissertation Fellowship in Economics, The Earhart Foundation, 1995-96

           

Hayek Scholarship for Young Scholars, Institute for Humane Studies, 1995, 2005

 

Summer Research Grant, Roosevelt University, Office of the Provost, 2004, 2005.

           

            Archival Research Support, Bowling Green State University (SPAR, the College of Business Administration, and the Department of Economics), 1996-2001

 

Summer Research Grant, College of Business, Bowling Green State University, 1998  

           

            International Travel Award, Dupree School of Management (CIBER), Georgia Institute of Technology, 2001

 

           

Other Professional Experience

 

            Caseworker: Marion County (Indianapolis) Department of Public Welfare, Summer 1987-Summer 1988.  Conducted home visits to determine eligibility of new and on-going applicants for AFDC, Food Stamps, Medicaid, and miscellaneous services.  Caseloads exceeded 125 homes per month.

           

            Labor Market Analyst: Indiana Department of Employment and Training Services, Summer 1988-Summer 1991.  Lead analyst of a team making long-term projections of industrial and occupational employment in Indiana’s labor market areas.  In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Labor.

 

            Research Analyst: Indiana Department of Employment and Training Services, Summer 1991.  Conducted post-program statistical evaluation of welfare-to-work programs initiated by the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA).

 

            Research Assistant: Summer 1992-Fall 1994, University of Iowa, with D. N. McCloskey.  Copyedited and assisted in the research of Knowledge and Persuasion in Economics (Cambridge University Press, 1994).

 

 

Teaching Experience

 

            Empirical Economics: Georgia Institute of Technology, Fall 2000, Spring 2001, Fall 2001, Fall 2002

 

Theme: “Empirical Analyses of Anti-Poverty Programs”

 

            Public Finance: Emory University, Fall 1999, Spring 2002; University of Iowa, Fall 1994, with Thomas F. Pogue, and Spring 1995, with Larry Sgontz.

           

Theme (at Emory): “The Rise and Fall of the Public Economy”

Theme (at Emory): “The Rhetoric of Harvey Rosen’s Public Finance”     

 

            Poverty and Discrimination (Honors):  Bowling Green State University, Spring 1999; Emory University, Spring 2001, Spring 2003

 

Theme: “Self-Reliance in American Economic Culture”

Theme: “The Rhetoric of Welfare and Poverty”

 

            Labor Economics (Honors):  Bowling Green State University, Spring 1998

 

Theme: “Self-Reliance in American Economic Culture”

 

            Economic History: Bowling Green State University, Fall 1996, Fall 1997, Fall 1998

 

Themes: “The Consequences of the Great Depression in the United States”; “Some Uses of Fiction in the Teaching of Undergraduate Economics”

 

            American Economic History: University of Iowa, Spring 1994, with Barbara J. McCutcheon. 

 

Theme: “Causes of Growth in American Economic History”

 

Probability and Statistics:  Emory University, Fall 1999.

 

Theme: “Statistics as a Style of Reasoning”   

 

            Economics for Decision-Makers: Georgia Tech, Spring 2003; Roosevelt University: (for MBAs), Spring 2004.

 

Theme: “Problem Solving”

 

            Intermediate Microeconomics: Emory University, Summer 2000, Summer 2001; University of Iowa, Fall 1992, with D. N. McCloskey, and Spring 1994, with Carol Fethke.

 

            Graduate/Undergraduate Macroeconomics: Roosevelt University, Fall 2003, Spring 2004, Fall 2004, Spring 2005, Fall 2005.

 

Advanced Microeconomics (Graduate): Roosevelt University, Spring 2007.

 

            Principles of Microeconomics: Roosevelt University, Fall 2003; Georgia Institute of Technology, Spring 2001, Spring 2002; Bowling Green, Fall 1998; University of Iowa, Summer 1994

 

Theme (at Bowling Green): “Race and Gender in the American Economy”

 

                        Introduction to Economics: Georgia Institute of Technology, Fall 2000, Spring 2002, Summer 2002, Fall 2002; Bowling Green: Spring 1996, Fall 1997, Spring 1999, Summer 1999

 

Theme (at Tech, 200+ students): “Twelve Pearls of Economic Wisdom”

 

            Theme (at Bowling Green): “Libertarian and Progressive Attitudes Toward Markets;” “The Grapes of Wrath”

 

            Principles of Macroeconomics: Georgia Tech, Fall 2001; Emory University, Spring 2000; University of Iowa, Fall 1991, Spring 1992; Roosevelt, Fall 2003, Spring 2004, Fall 2004, Spring 2005, Fall 2005.

 

Theme (at Emory): “The Grapes of Wrath”

Theme (at Tech, 200+ students): “Economics for Good Living”

 

Graduate/Undergraduate “Rhetoric and Writing in Economics and Other Human Sciences,” Roosevelt University, Spring 2006.

 

Representative Affiliations

 

American Economic Association; American Statistical Association; Association for Social Economics; Association for Heterodox Economics; Cliometric Society; Eastern Economic Association; Economic History Association; Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Association; International Network on Economic Method; Midwest Economic Association; Society for Critical Exchange (New Economic Criticism); and the Social Science History Association.

  


I'm thinking these days about poverty and social policy, American economic history, and the rhetoric of the human sciences.  My research has been published in a wide variety of journals and books, including the Journal of Economic Literature, the Journal of Economic History, and Historical Statistics of the United States: Colonial Times to the Present (2006). The Cult of Statistical Significance, my book with Deirdre McCloskey on the tragedy of statistical significance, is nearly out (forthcoming Jan. 2008, University of Michigan Press). 

It became clear to me during the archival research phase of the book that William Sealy Gosset (aka "Student"), the inventor of among other things the t-distribution, Monte Carlo analysis, alternative hypotheses, and the economic design of experiments, was working in the front ranks of science. Yet today Gosset is widely ignored if not plain unknown.  Even frequent users of t-tables do not know who "Student" was. The eugencist Sir Ronald Fisher claimed to be Gosset's friend, and was.  But Fisher published and copyrighted a distorted version of Gosset's technical contributions to scientific inference.  In his struggle to become the great man of 20th century statistics, Fisher erased Gosset's economic, Bayesian, and confirmationist philosophy of inference, retaining only a skeleton of Gosset's powerful "test." A second book will tell why Gosset, a humble brewer of Guinness beer, should be widely known in economics, business, medicine, and other fields concerned with making profits and saving jobs and lives.  The Gosset test is uniformly more powerful than the Fisher test.

Other book projects concern the ideas and practices of self-reliance in American economic culture; state charities and corrections before the New Deal; economic criticism of English Literature; and haiku economics.

Contemporary rhetorical theory, critical thinking, and historical fiction give shape to the courses I teach. 

Read “On Autobiography” Recommendations for Reading (and Re-Reading) by Stephen T. Ziliak

Charlie Loves itRead "Haiku Economics, No. 2" (Rethinking Marxism [Oct. 2005]).
 

 

 

 

Martin Luther King Jr.Adam Smith A  

 

BIOGRAPHY ~ HETERODOX ~ RHETORIC ~ FUN ~ FAMILY & FRIENDS ~ MUSIC ~ LECTURES ~ BOOKS ~ NATURE ~ JOIN THE ECONOMIC CONVERSATION

©2007 Stephen T. Ziliak
Site Design by Mr. Fred

Last Updated: Monday, September 30, 2013 04:41:21 PM